On Headlines – Cisco Declines, Arista Gains

The following headline from Network Computing is accurate but misleading:

“Ethernet Switch Market: Cisco Declines, Arista Gains”

From just the headline one can assume Arista is getting close to Cisco Market share and about to gain the lead, but reading the article reveals more information.

Cisco is indeed declining, Market share dropped to 55.1% from 59%. This goes inline with global trend of having an option and Open Ethernet.

While Arista is gaining, 5.1% from 3.9%  . An impressive gain, but no where near Cisco.

A more important detail and maybe a catchier headline would have been Huawei. 6.3% from 3.9%.   Yes, Huawei surpassed Arista in Market share, yet the headline discusses Arista.

Not Fake news, but interesting interpretation.

Installation duration estimation

Xcode installation is stuck in “Installing – 3 minutes” for more than 20 minutes, which gives me a reason to complain about Installation estimates.

We ALL know that there is no way to really estimate it , so why do it ?
It is helpful to know the percentage of installation and what else is needed to be done, but do I really want to state at a “Installing – 3 minutes” for more than 3 minutes?  Moreover, it sometimes changes to 4 or 5 minutes, which is even more annoying.

 

installing

Google maps – Blurred Gimpo Airpot

As I was browsing Seoul map, I had hard time finding Gimpo Airport. Searching for it, I found it is a grey area with no details. Completely blurred out.

Gimpo blurred

Was thinking it is some kind of security measure, but found out that the satellite imagery is very clear and detailed.

So, what is it ? Security ? mistake ?

Gimpo Satelite

Just for reference, you can see Japan Haneda airpot in Google map

 

Haneda map

iPhone Google+

Maybe apparent from my age, but I remember the times when programmers were working extra time to make sure their application “weight” is minimal.
Either memory consumption or actual binary size (for embedded systems with limited storage).

Was surprised (shocked) to see the new Google+ update is 111MB.
Yes, 111MB of application which shows content from the web.
Not a game, Google+.

I assume it is due to Retina display graphics, but I still think this is not the right way to do it.
Application can get the necessary files after loading, can’t it? Why everyone need to waste storage for unnecessary data ?

IMG_4019.PNG

The Power of Hype

Or maybe rather, the power of Marketing.

Although most of my work is Technical, discussing Technical details with extremely Technical people, I am sometimes surprised by the Power of Hype.

It is not about the latest SmartPhone or gadget, but it is sometimes about latest Technology trends. Even when there is not much behind it, I notice it is being discussed and considered because “people talk about it”.

One thing that I can’t do is “object the Hype”. I can explain it, talk about it, but I can’t say “this is Hype”, because I will be considered “uninformed” (or maybe “not cool”)

Energy Monitor – Mac OS

Available from Mavericks, but just “found” it.

As I work outside the office VERY often, this may be the most important monitoring tab for me. Not only the applications which consume a lot of CPU time in a certain time, but the ones which consistently drain my battery.

Google Chrome and Outlook look the main culprits while Apple application are better

Energy Monitor

Damage Control 101 – Blow out of proportions

I may be speculating here, but the Iran Virus story and media coverage made me think.

Facts:

  1. Siemens SCADA systems around the world were hit by Stuxnet virus.
  2. Some of the systems are in Iran
  3. From BBC report: “Stuxnet was first detected in June by a security firm based in Belarus, but may have been circulating since 2009.”
  4. “Siemens was neither involved in the reconstruction of Bushehr or any nuclear plant construction in Iran, nor delivered any software or control system,” he said. “Siemens left the country nearly 30 years ago.”
  5. “Siemens said that it was only aware of 15 infections that had made their way on to control systems in factories, mostly in Germany.”

Yet the Media speculates:

  • “The sophisticated super virus Stuxnet” – Deutche Welle
  • “One of the most sophisticated pieces of malware ever detected was probably targeting “high value” infrastructure in Iran, experts have told the BBC.”
  • “Stuxnet’s complexity suggests it could only have been written by a “nation state”, some researchers have claimed”
  • “The fact that we see so many more infections in Iran than anywhere else in the world makes us think this threat was targeted at Iran and that there was something in Iran that was of very, very high value to whomever wrote it,” Liam O’Murchu of security firm Symantec, who has tracked the worm since it was first detected, told BBC News.

Facts seem to contradict the speculation, but the story becomes more interesting, doesn’t it?

However, Mr O’Murchu and others, such as security expert Bruce Schneier, have said that there was currently not enough evidence to draw conclusions about what its intended target was or who had written it.

And now my speculation:

As Siemens are obviously do not actively involve themselves in the PR and reports of  “some researchers have claimed”, it looks like Symantec are doing all they can do to blow this story out of proportions. This is not a story of “Symantec software failed to identify and stop a malware”, but “Symantec cannot possibly identify and stop such a sophisticated Super Virus written by a Nation State”.